Close
FINDING CURES TOGETHER<sup>SM</sup>

News Releases

 

 

MicroRNA Panel Shows Early Potential as Biomarker of Pancreatic Precancers17925598/27/2015 1:11:57 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx751False2015-08-27T04:05:00Z<div class="ExternalClass0CDE1D6CA8794F63A232A5DD337916AB"><p>PHILADELPHIA — Assessing blood plasma levels of certain micro-RNAs (miRNAs) distinguished individuals with noninvasive pancreatic precancers called intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) from healthy individuals and discriminated between patients with high-risk and low-risk IPMNs, according to a preliminary, proof-of-principle <a href="http&#58;//cancerpreventionresearch.aacrjournals.org/content/early/2015/08/25/1940-6207.CAPR-15-0094.abstract" target="_blank">study</a> published in <em>Cancer Prevention Research</em>, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.<img alt="Jennifer Permuth-Wey, PhD" src="/PublishingImages/Wey_Jennifer_150x200.jpg" style="margin&#58;10px;vertical-align&#58;auto;float&#58;right;" /></p><p>“<a href="https&#58;//www.aacrfoundation.org/CancerTypes/Pages/Pancreatic-Cancer.aspx" target="_blank">Pancreatic cancer</a> is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States,” said <a href="https&#58;//moffitt.org/clinical-trials-research/researchers/jenny-permuth-wey/" target="_blank">Jennifer Permuth-Wey, PhD</a>, assistant member in the Departments of Cancer Epidemiology and Gastrointestinal Oncology at the <a href="https&#58;//moffitt.org/" target="_blank">Moffitt Cancer Center</a> in Tampa, Florida. “It is typically diagnosed at a late stage because there are currently no accurate methods to diagnose pancreatic cancer early. Noninvasive tests are needed to accurately detect precancerous lesions of the pancreas so that personalized risk assessment and care can be provided.</p><p>“Our study shows that new, relatively inexpensive digital technology could reliably measure miRNAs in blood plasma from individuals newly diagnosed with pancreatic cancer precursors called IPMNs, and healthy individuals,” continued Permuth-Wey. “This is promising news and could potentially lead to a noninvasive test for early detection of pancreatic cancer. However, the results are preliminary and much more research is needed to determine if a miRNA-based blood test could help diagnose pancreatic cancer earlier or more effectively than current methods.”</p><p>Permuth-Wey explained that the main goals of the study were to measure miRNAs in the blood and determine whether a set of miRNAs could distinguish patients with IPMNs from healthy individuals, and whether a set of miRNAs could discriminate between patients with high-risk IPMNs that need to be surgically removed and those with low-risk IPMNs that can be monitored.</p><p>Using nCounter technology to measure the levels of 800 miRNAs in plasma samples obtained preoperatively from 44 patients who underwent surgery to remove IPMNs surgically and 25 healthy individuals, the researchers identified a panel of 30 miRNAs that distinguished individuals with IPMNs from those who were healthy with an area under the curve (AUC) value of 0.74. Permuth-Wey explained that AUC is a way to quantify the discriminative ability or accuracy of a diagnostic test and that a perfect diagnostic test has an AUC of 1.0 while a useless or nondiscriminating test has an AUC of 0.5, which is no better than chance alone.</p><p>The researchers also identified a panel of five miRNAs that discriminated between patients with high-risk and low-risk IPMNs with an AUC of 0.73. “To be able to distinguish between these two sets of patients is important clinically,” said senior author <a href="https&#58;//www.moffitt.org/providers/mokenge-malafa/" target="_blank">Mokenge Malafa, MD</a>, department chair and program leader for the Gastrointestinal Tumor Program at Moffitt Cancer Center. “It would help personalize care such that high-risk IPMNs that warrant resection are properly identified while individuals with low-risk IPMNs are spared the substantial risks associated with unnecessary surgery.”</p><p>According to Permuth-Wey, limitations of the study include the small number of samples analyzed and the fact that the accuracy of the 30-miRNA panel and the five-miRNA panel were 74 percent and 73 percent, respectively, when many researchers think that accuracy greater than 90 percent may be needed for a test to be clinically useful. She went on to note that large-scale, multicenter studies with rigorous designs and incorporation of other types information, such as data from imaging scans and laboratory tests offered as part of clinical care, are needed to overcome these limitations and further explore the potential for miRNAs to be utilized clinically as markers for the early detection of pancreatic cancer.</p><p>This study was funded by the American Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute. Permuth-Wey and Malafa are among the named inventors on a provisional patent application filed on the basis of results from this study.</p><p>Further information on pancreatic cancer can be found <a href="https&#58;//www.aacrfoundation.org/CancerTypes/Pages/Pancreatic-Cancer.aspx" target="_blank">here</a> and further information on rising U.S. pancreatic cancer death rates can be found <a href="/Newsroom/Pages/News-Release-Detail.aspx?ItemID=541" target="_blank">here</a>.</p></div>
High Proportion of Women Experience Anxiety Following False-positive Screening Mammography17864128/26/2015 1:08:15 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx750False2015-08-26T04:05:00ZStudy results can help health care providers give women objective information on pros and cons of screening<div class="ExternalClassE8535118F7A446FD96BE4B5F8D947AC6"><p>PHILADELPHIA — A high proportion of women who had false-positive screening mammography reported experiencing psychosocial consequences such as anxiety, sense of dejection, and negative effects on behavior and sleeping, and for some women these consequences persisted for 12 months, according to a <a href="http&#58;//cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/early/2015/08/10/1055-9965.EPI-15-0060.abstract" target="_blank">study</a> published in <em>Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers &amp; Prevention</em>, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.<img alt="Anetta Bolejko, PhD" src="/PublishingImages/Bolejko_Anetta_150x200.jpg" style="margin&#58;10px;vertical-align&#58;auto;float&#58;right;" /></p><p>False-positive screening mammography is a course of events that follows an abnormal mammogram, which after recall and additional diagnostic work-up—for example, clinical mammography, ultrasound, and biopsy—is considered not to be breast cancer, explained Anetta Bolejko, PhD, in the Department of Medical Imaging and Physiology at <a href="https&#58;//www.skane.se/sv/Webbplatser/Skanes-universitetssjukhus/Skane-University-Hospital/About-Us/" target="_blank">Skåne University Hospital</a> in Malmö, Sweden.</p><p>Among women who experienced false-positive screening mammography, 88 percent reported having a sense of dejection, such as being uneasy, sad, or unable to cope, before learning that the positive (suspicious) screening mammogram was not <a href="https&#58;//www.aacrfoundation.org/CancerTypes/Pages/Breast-Cancer.aspx" target="_blank">breast cancer</a>. Eighty-three percent reported anxiety, 67 percent reported experiencing an effect on behavior, such as difficulty dealing with spare time or work, and 53 percent experienced difficulty sleeping.</p><p>“Although mammographic screening leads to breast cancer mortality reduction in the population, some women experience side effects and do not benefit from the screening program,” said Bolejko. “Experiences of psychosocial distress among women who underwent diagnostic work-up following a suspicious mammogram and among which no malignancy was found [women who experienced false-positive screening mammography] are an example of adverse effects of breast cancer screening.</p><p>“Our results show that psychosocial consequences of false-positive screening mammograms are common and can persist over time, with approximately one-third of women experiencing psychosocial consequences up to one year after the diagnostic work-up,” added Bolejko. “This is important, because women invited to attend mammographic screening should be informed about the potential benefits and harm of the program, and the risk of long-term psychosocial consequences of false-positive screening mammography should be acknowledged.”</p><p>Bolejko and colleagues used the Swedish Consequences of Screening – Breast Cancer (COS-BC) questionnaire to investigate the extent of psychosocial consequences of false-positive screening mammography among 399 women who were enrolled in the study immediately after recall to the diagnostic work-up following an abnormal mammogram, and later being considered that breast cancer was not found. These women responded to the Swedish COS-BC questionnaire upon enrollment, according to how they felt before the final diagnosis (considered free from breast cancer), and then at six and 12 months later.</p><p>At all time points, women who had false-positive screening mammography were significantly more likely to report psychosocial consequences compared with women who had a negative (no breast cancer) screening mammogram. At the first time point, they were more than five times more likely to report psychosocial consequences and at six and 12 months later they were more than twice as likely to report psychosocial consequences.</p><p>In multivariate analyses, the researchers found that early recall was a predictor for experiencing psychosocial consequences, as were dissatisfaction with information at the diagnostic work-up, being foreign-born, and lack of social support.</p><p>“We were surprised to find that women who are frequently monitored by additional clinical mammography [early recall] following a false-positive screening mammogram experienced psychosocial consequences,” said Bolejko. “This means that we think that early recall should be applied cautiously because it seems to create confusion and maintain psychosocial distress.”</p><p>Bolejko explained that the limitations of the study include that the researchers investigated the extent of psychosocial consequences and not the relevance of the consequences. She noted that the Swedish COS-BC has its limitation in providing this information. To learn about the relevance of psychosocial consequences of false-positive screening mammography, the perception of the individual woman also needs to be explored.&#160; </p><p>The senior author of the study is Sophia Zackrisson, MD, associate professor in the Department of Medical Imaging and Physiology.</p><p>This study was funded by the Department of Medical Imaging and Physiology at Skåne University Hospital and through governmental funding of clinical research within the National Health Services, Lund University, in Sweden. Bolejko declares no conflicts of interest.</p></div>
Non-Hispanic Black Women Less Likely to Survive Endometrial Cancer Than Women of Other Races and Ethnicities17445648/19/2015 1:09:53 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx749False2015-08-19T04:05:00ZEndometrial cancer incidence rising across all U.S. racial and ethnic groups<div class="ExternalClass98A6226F7EFC492DAB354E21485C867A"><p>PHILADELPHIA — Non-Hispanic black women with <a href="https&#58;//www.aacrfoundation.org/CancerTypes/Pages/Endometrial-Cancer.aspx" target="_blank">endometrial cancer</a> had worse outcomes than women in other racial/ethnic groups diagnosed with the same subtype of endometrial cancer and at the same stage of disease, according to a <a href="http&#58;//cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/early/2015/08/10/1055-9965.EPI-15-0316.abstract" target="_blank">study</a> published in <em>Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers &amp; Prevention</em>, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.<img alt="Michele L. Cote, PhD" src="/PublishingImages/Cote_Michele_150x200.jpg" style="margin&#58;10px;vertical-align&#58;auto;float&#58;right;" /></p><p>“Endometrial cancer is the most commonly diagnosed gynecologic cancer in the United States and incidence rates have been rising for many years,” said Michele L. Cote, PhD, an associate professor of oncology at the <a href="http&#58;//www.karmanos.org/home" target="_blank">Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute</a> and <a href="http&#58;//home.med.wayne.edu/" target="_blank">Wayne State University School of Medicine</a> in Detroit. “We set out to investigate whether the increasing incidence and mortality from endometrial cancer are equally distributed by race/ethnicity and endometrial cancer subtype.</p><p>“The most significant finding was that non-Hispanic black women had poorer outcomes compared with non-Hispanic white women diagnosed with the same subtype of endometrial cancer and at the same stage of disease, while Hispanic and Asian women had similar or better outcomes compared with their non-Hispanic white counterparts,” added Cote. “Prior studies have suggested that disparities in outcomes from endometrial cancer might be explained by differences in tumor subtype or stage at diagnosis, but our data suggest that disparities persist even when these factors are controlled for.”</p><p>Cote and colleagues analyzed endometrial cancer incidence and mortality data from the <a href="http&#58;//seer.cancer.gov/" target="_blank">Surveillance, Epidemiology, End Results </a>(SEER) database, including only the 120,513 cases diagnosed from 2000 to 2011.</p><p>Over the 12 years studied, endometrial cancer incidence rates increased among all racial and ethnic groups, with rates increasing fastest, at 2.5 percent per year, among non-Hispanic black women and Asian women. Non-Hispanic black women had higher rates of all the aggressive endometrial cancer subtypes than non-Hispanic white, Asian, and Hispanic women.</p><p>Mortality rates for the aggressive endometrial cancer subtypes were more than 1.5-fold higher among non-Hispanic black women compared with non-Hispanic white women, while mortality rates for these subtypes were similar or lower among Asian and Hispanic women compared with non-Hispanic white women.</p><p>Analysis of overall five-year survival rates showed that non-Hispanic black women had poorer survival at every stage of diagnosis, regardless of endometrial cancer subtype, compared with non-Hispanic white women, while five-year survival rates were similar or higher among Asian and Hispanic women compared with non-Hispanic white women. </p><p>“It was somewhat surprising that the endometrial cancer survival disparity we identified was limited to non-Hispanic black women because many of the challenges previously linked to worse outcomes, including low socioeconomic status and high rates of obesity and diabetes, are also experienced by Hispanic women, but that population did not have poor outcomes,” said Cote. “We are, therefore, interested in investigating whether there are molecular differences in endometrial tumors of the same subtype from women of different races or ethnicities diagnosed at the same stage of disease.”</p><p>According to Cote, a limitation of the study is that the data analyzed were from the SEER database, which meant the researchers did not have tumor samples and were, therefore, unable to perform a review of the tumor subtype to ensure they had been classified correctly. In addition, SEER does not collect information on other factors that may be associated with incidence and survival, thus potential causes for the disparities identified in this study cannot be further examined.</p><p>This study was funded by the National Institutes of Health. Cote declares no conflicts of interest.</p></div>
Nominations Open for 2016 Pezcoller Foundation-AACR International Award for Cancer Research16302377/30/2015 8:34:01 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx747False2015-07-31T13:30:00Z<div class="ExternalClassF3F8E9789F6242C98BFB79E5F68E67A9"><p>PHILADELPHIA — The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) is accepting nominations for the 2016 Pezcoller Foundation-AACR International Award for Cancer Research.</p><p>The <a href="/Research/Awards/Pages/Awards-Detail.aspx?ItemId=16">Pezcoller Foundation-AACR International Award for Cancer Research</a> recognizes a scientist of international renown who has made a major scientific discovery in basic cancer research or who has made significant contributions to translational cancer research; who continues to be active in cancer research and has a record of recent, noteworthy publications; and whose ongoing work holds promise for continued substantive contributions to progress in the field of cancer.</p><p>The recipient of the 19th annual award will present a 50-minute lecture at the <a href="/Meetings/Pages/MeetingDetail.aspx?EventItemID=63">AACR Annual Meeting 2016</a>, to be held April 16-20, in New Orleans, and receive an honorarium of 75,000 euros. </p><p>The 2015 award honored the immunotherapy pioneer <a href="/Newsroom/Pages/News-Release-Detail.aspx?ItemID=685#.Va0S76RVhHw">James P. Allison</a>, PhD, professor and chair of the Department of Immunology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, for his discovery that blocking cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) signaling improves antitumor immune responses and his role in the development of the CTLA-4 inhibitor ipilimumab (Yervoy). His award lecture was titled, “Immune Checkpoint Blockade in Cancer Therapy&#58; New Insights, Opportunities and Prospects for a Cure.”</p><ul><li>Deadline for nominations&#58; Aug. 12, 2015</li><li><a href="/Research/Awards/Pages/Awards-Detail.aspx?ItemId=16">Review the award information</a> or&#160;contact Monique P. Eversley at <a href="mailto&#58;awards@aacr.org">awards@aacr.org</a> to learn more. </li></ul></div>
Exercise During Adolescence Linked to Lowered Risk of Death Later16333287/31/2015 1:10:59 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx748False2015-07-31T04:05:00Z<div class="ExternalClassA7DC4E8B701F47A286E19B9BF182F9AA"><p>PHILADELPHIA — Women who participated in exercise as adolescents had a reduced risk of death from cancer and all causes in their middle and older ages, according to a <a href="http&#58;//cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/early/2015/07/16/1055-9965.EPI-15-0253.abstract" target="_blank">study</a> published in <em>Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers &amp; Prevention</em>, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.<img alt="Sarah J. Nechuta, MPH, PhD" src="/PublishingImages/Nechuta_Sarah_150x200.jpg" style="margin&#58;10px;vertical-align&#58;auto;float&#58;right;" /></p><p>“In women, adolescent exercise participation, regardless of adult exercise, was associated with reduced risk of cancer and all-cause mortality,” said <a href="https&#58;//medschool.mc.vanderbilt.edu/facdb/show_faculty.php?id3=132662" target="_blank">Sarah J. Nechuta, MPH, PhD</a>, assistant professor of medicine at Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center and <a href="http&#58;//www.vicc.org/" target="_blank">Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center</a> in Nashville, Tennessee. “Our results support the importance of promoting exercise participation in adolescence to reduce mortality in later life and highlight the critical need for the initiation of disease prevention early in life.”</p><p>After adjusting for socioeconomic factors in adult life, the researchers found that women who participated in exercise as adolescents for 1.33 hours a week or less had a 16 percent lowered risk for death from cancer, and a 15 percent lowered risk for death from all causes; those who participated in exercise as adolescents for more than 1.33 hours a week had a 13 percent lowered risk for death from all causes.</p><p>After adjusting for socioeconomic factors in adult life, women who participated in team sports as adolescents had a 14 percent lowered risk for death from cancer, and a 10 percent lowered risk for death from all causes. Women who participated in exercise both in their adolescent and adult lives had a 20 percent lowered risk for death from all causes.</p><p>“While we found adolescent exercise to be associated with lowered risk of death from cancer and cardiovascular disease as adults, some associations were attenuated after adjusting for adult factors that may influence mortality later in life, such as exercise, diet, body mass index [BMI], socioeconomic status, and a history of chronic diseases. However, it is important to note that adult factors, such as adult exercise, BMI, and chronic diseases are potentially influenced by adolescent exercise, and adjusting for adult factors in these types of studies may not always be the best approach, as overadjustment could be a concern,” Nechuta added.</p><p>“It is important to note that the exercise data were self-reported and potential measurement error cannot be excluded. Further, we only had data on exercise and did not have information on activities related to transportation or occupation. Future studies with more detailed adolescent physical activity assessments and studies in other populations are needed,” she noted.</p><p>Nechuta and colleagues used data from the <a href="http&#58;//www.mc.vanderbilt.edu/swhs-smhs/" target="_blank">Shanghai Women’s Health Study</a>, a large, population-based prospective cohort study of about 75,000 women ages 40 to 70, from Shanghai, China, led by Wei Zheng, MD, PhD, at the Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center. The study had detailed information on participants reported at baseline recruitment, including self-reported exercise participation between the ages of 13 and 19, adult lifestyle-related factors, and mortality outcomes. In-person interviews were conducted to collect baseline data and follow-up data every two to three years.</p><p>After an average of 12.9 years of follow-up, there were 5,282 deaths, including 2,375 from cancer and 1,620 from cardiovascular disease.</p><p>This study was funded by the National Institutes of Health. Nechuta declares no conflicts of interest.</p></div>
AACR Accepting Calls for Nominations for 2016 Team Science Award16298667/30/2015 7:52:35 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx746False2015-07-30T17:00:00Z<div class="ExternalClass95676E5A71CA4545BEF45D10CEEE8B12"><p>PHILADELPHIA — The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) is accepting nominations for the 2016 AACR Team Science Award.</p><p>The <a href="/Research/Awards/Pages/Awards-Detail.aspx?ItemId=8">AACR Team Science Award</a>, now in its 10th year, recognizes an outstanding interdisciplinary research team for its innovative and meritorious scientific work that has advanced, or will likely advance cancer research, detection, diagnosis, prevention, or treatment. </p><p>The winning team will be recognized at the <a href="/Meetings/Pages/MeetingDetail.aspx?EventItemID=63">AACR Annual Meeting 2016</a>, to be held April 16-20, in New Orleans, and will collectively receive a $50,000 prize, generously supported by grants from Eli Lilly and Company.</p><p>The 2015 award recognized the <a href="/Newsroom/Pages/News-Release-Detail.aspx?ItemID=689">Designing AR Inhibitors Team</a> for their collective work in discovering and developing the novel antiandrogen enzalutamide (Xtandi) for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. The team was comprised of Charles Sawyers, MD, PhD, team leader, director of the Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Howard Scher, MD, chief of genitourinary oncology service at Memorial Sloan Kettering; and Michael Jung, PhD, distinguished professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of California, Los Angeles.</p><ul><li>Deadline for nominations&#58; Aug. 5, 2015</li><li><a href="/Research/Awards/Pages/Awards-Detail.aspx?ItemId=8">Review the award information</a> or&#160;contact Monique P. Eversley at <a href="mailto&#58;awards@aacr.org">awards@aacr.org</a> to learn more. </li></ul></div>
Nominations Open for 2016 AACR-CRI Lloyd J. Old Award in Cancer Immunology16292917/30/2015 6:13:49 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx745False2015-07-30T16:00:00Z<div class="ExternalClass2BF5AD0FF6EB4FC68F2B103BADB1FD5D"><p>PHILADELPHIA — The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) is accepting nominations for the 2016 AACR-Cancer Research Institute (CRI) Lloyd J. Old Award in Cancer Immunology.</p><p>The <a href="/Research/Awards/Pages/Awards-Detail.aspx?ItemId=2">Lloyd J. Old Award in Cancer Immunology</a> was established in 2013 to honor the memory of the late Lloyd J. Old, MD, who is considered the “Father of Modern Tumor Immunology,” and to recognize an active scientist whose outstanding and innovative research in cancer immunology has had a far-reaching impact on the cancer field.</p><p>The recipient of the fourth annual award will receive a $10,000 honorarium and present a 50-minute lecture at the <a href="/Meetings/Pages/MeetingDetail.aspx?EventItemID=63">AACR Annual Meeting 2016</a>, to be held April 16-20, in New Orleans.</p><p>The 2015 award recognized <a href="/Newsroom/Pages/News-Release-Detail.aspx?ItemID=691">Carl H. June, MD</a>, program director of translational research at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, for his important contributions to cancer immunology, specifically his pioneering efforts related to the development of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy. June delivered his award lecture titled, “CAR T Cells&#58; Can We Move Beyond B Cells?”</p><ul><li>Deadline for nominations&#58; Aug. 5, 2015</li><li><a href="/Research/Awards/Pages/Awards-Detail.aspx?ItemId=2">Review the award information</a>&#160;or contact Monique P. Eversley at <a href="mailto&#58;awards@aacr.org">awards@aacr.org</a> to learn more.</li></ul></div>
Breast Cancer Survivors Gain More Weight Than Cancer-free Women15374957/15/2015 1:03:46 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx744False2015-07-15T04:20:00ZPost-treatment weight gain is implicated in heart disease and other complications<div class="ExternalClassFFA64E4A44F54A489C7CAE59BFC7EE9F"><p>​PHILADELPHIA — Among women with a family history of breast cancer, those diagnosed with breast cancer gained weight at a greater rate compared with cancer-free women of the same age and menopausal status, according to a <a href="http&#58;//cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/early/2015/07/09/1055-9965.EPI-15-0212.abstract" target="_blank">study</a> published in <em>Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers &amp; Prevention</em>, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.&#160;</p><p> <img src="/PublishingImages/Visvanathan_Kala_150x200.jpg" alt="" style="margin&#58;5px 10px;vertical-align&#58;auto;float&#58;right;" />&quot;Our study showed that women diagnosed with breast cancer and those who received chemotherapy to treat their breast cancer gained more weight within the first five years of diagnosis and treatment than cancer-free women,&quot; said the study's senior author, <a href="http&#58;//www.jhsph.edu/faculty/directory/profile/3969/kala-visvanathan" target="_blank">Kala Visvanathan, MD, MHS</a>, associate professor of epidemiology at the <a href="http&#58;//www.jhsph.edu/" target="_blank">Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health</a> and director of the Clinical Cancer Genetics and Prevention Service at the <a href="http&#58;//www.hopkinsmedicine.org/kimmel_cancer_center/" target="_blank">Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center</a> in Baltimore.</p><p>Of the women treated with chemotherapy within the past five years, 21 percent gained at least 11 pounds over follow-up. &quot;This is of concern because weight gain of this magnitude in adults has been associated with increased future risk for chronic diseases like coronary heart disease, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes,&quot; said the paper's first author, Amy Gross, MHS, doctoral candidate in the department of epidemiology at Bloomberg School of Public Health.</p><p>&quot;This study highlights the need for physicians and their patients, including those with a family history of the disease, to pay closer attention to weight gain during and after treatment,&quot; Visvanathan said.</p><p>Visvanathan and colleagues recruited 303 breast cancer survivors and 307 age- and menopausal status-matched, cancer-free women from the <a href="http&#58;//www.hopkinsmedicine.org/breast_center/treatments_services/breast_cancer_diagnosis/breast_ovarian_surveillance_service_genetic_testing/" target="_blank">Breast and Ovarian Surveillance Service</a> cohort study, which comprises women with familial risk for breast and ovarian cancer, including BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Eligible study participants were those who had completed a baseline questionnaire (the time point referred to as T1) and at least one follow-up questionnaire (administered every three or four years). Weight gain was computed using data from T1 and follow-up questionnaires.</p><p>The researchers found that survivors who were diagnosed with breast cancer within five years before T1 had gained an average of 3.81 pounds more than cancer-free women. Survivors who were diagnosed with estrogen receptor-negative invasive cancer within five years before T1 had gained an average of 7.26 pounds more than cancer-free women. No significant weight gain was seen among those diagnosed with breast cancer more than five years before T1 or those treated with hormonal therapy for their estrogen receptor-positive cancer.</p><p>Survivors who had received chemotherapy (with or without hormonal therapy) within five years before T1 were more than twice as likely to have gained at least 11 pounds compared with cancer-free women. No significant weight gain was observed in those treated with chemotherapy more than five years before T1.</p><p>&quot;Longer follow-up is needed to confirm the persistence of weight gain in breast cancer survivors and understand the metabolic changes that may be occurring,&quot; Visvanathan cautioned.&#160;</p><p>&quot;We are continuing to follow our study participants to track weight-gain patterns over a longer period of time,&quot; Gross added.&#160;</p><p>Of the 303 breast cancer survivors, 179 had received treatment within five years of T1 and 123 had received treatment more than five years before T1. About 50 percent reported receiving chemotherapy, and about two-thirds reported receiving hormonal therapy. Sixty-eight percent of the breast cancer survivors and 72 percent of the cancer-free women had reported baseline physical activity that met the American Heart Association recommendations.</p><p>This study was funded by the Breast Cancer Research Foundation and the National Institutes of Health. Visvanathan declares no conflicts of interest.</p> </div>
Three Large U.S. Hot Spots Have Excessive Colorectal Cancer Death Rates 14952897/8/2015 2:22:48 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx743False2015-07-08T04:05:00ZMost of the country has seen large decline in disease death rates; data warrant targeted screening intervention<div class="ExternalClassB8908C90FC834816A2A6AE8AAAC4F44C"><p>PHILADELPHIA — While most of the United States has experienced large declines in colorectal cancer death rates in recent years, progress in the Mississippi Delta and two other areas has lagged, according to a <a href="http&#58;//cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/early/2015/06/30/1055-9965.EPI-15-0082.abstract" target="_blank">study</a> published in <em>Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers &amp; Prevention</em>, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. <a href="/Newsroom/PublishingImages/colorectal-cancer-hot-spots.jpg" target="_blank"><img alt="Colorectal Cancer Hot Spots" src="/PublishingImages/colorectal-cancer-hot-spots_320x247.jpg" style="margin&#58;10px;vertical-align&#58;auto;float&#58;right;" /></a></p><p>The lower Mississippi Delta, encompassing 94 counties, was identified as the hot spot with the highest colorectal cancer death rates, followed by 107 counties in west central Appalachia, and 37 counties in eastern Virginia/North Carolina.</p><p>“We expanded on an earlier state-level analysis by using a geospatial software tool to identify clusters of counties in the United States that have unnecessarily high colorectal cancer death rates,” said <a href="http&#58;//www.cancer.org/research/acsresearchers/rebecca-siegel-mph" target="_blank">Rebecca Siegel, MPH</a>, director of surveillance information in the Surveillance and Health Services Research Program at the <a href="http&#58;//www.cancer.org/index" target="_blank">American Cancer Society</a> in Atlanta, Georgia.</p><p>“We identified three distinct hot spots—the lower Mississippi Delta, west central Appalachia, and eastern Virginia/North Carolina—where colorectal cancer death rates are elevated compared with most of the country,” Siegel added. “Further, while the rates have begun to decrease in the lower Mississippi Delta for most population groups, they remain stagnant in black men.</p><p>“Although we’ve made great strides against colorectal cancer in a fairly short time period, there are a lot of vulnerable populations that aren’t benefiting. Now that these groups have been identified, there is a moral obligation to do something about it,” Siegel said.</p><p>Siegel explained that over the past few decades we have learned how to prevent most colorectal cancer deaths, which has led to a drop in the U.S. colorectal cancer death rate by half. However, progress has not been equivalent in all states, and large differences exist among states, which she and her colleagues identified in a previous study. For this study, the researchers gathered and analyzed data at a more granular level because targeted interventions are often more feasible on a smaller scale, she said.</p><p>Siegel and colleagues used a geospatial software tool to identify areas of very low rates of colorectal cancer deaths, called cold spots, and areas of very high rates, called hot spots. For areas identified as hot spots, death rates were plotted from 1970 to 2011 and rate ratios were calculated to compare trends over time between hot spots and the rest of the United States.</p><p>Using this spatial mapping, the researchers identified three distinct hot spots. The lower Mississippi Delta hot spot had colorectal cancer death rates that were 40 percent higher than the nonhot spot areas in the country during 2009-2011. Rates in the hot spots in west central Appalachia and eastern Virginia/North Carolina were 18 percent and 9 percent higher, respectively, than those of the nonhot spot areas in the country during this time period.</p><p>The colorectal cancer death rate increased steadily, by 3.5 percent per year, for black men in the lower Mississippi Delta between 1970 and 1990, and has since remained unchanged.</p><p>“These areas are low-hanging fruit for colorectal cancer screening interventions,” Siegel said. “Targeted interventions, like using people within the community to talk to their neighbors about screening, are likely to be effective. We know interventions work because we have an example in Delaware, where they implemented statewide colorectal cancer screening and effectively eliminated disparities in less than a decade.”</p><p>The authors also noted in their paper a crossover of death rates in the lower Mississippi Delta with those in the rest of the United States around 1990&#58; In the early 1970s, death rates in the delta were 18 percent lower than the average death rates in the country.</p><p>This study was funded by the American Cancer Society. Siegel declares no conflicts of interest.</p><p>&#160;</p><p><em>Map courtesy of the American Cancer Society</em></p></div>
​Cancer Today Summer Issue Addresses Financial Strain of Cancer Treatment14566176/30/2015 3:48:03 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx742False2015-06-30T13:00:00Z<div class="ExternalClass3A01E1EC2D0743988850FC5028DC0245"><p>PHILADELPHIA — The Summer 2015 issue of <a href="http&#58;//www.cancertodaymag.org/" target="_blank"><em>Cancer Today</em></a>, a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), features “<a href="http&#58;//www.cancertodaymag.org/SUmmer2015/Pages/The-Cost-of-Cancer-Debt-Resources-Help.aspx" target="_blank">The Cost of Cancer</a>,” about how cancer treatments can leave patients and their families heavily in debt. The article also offers resources patients can pursue for financial relief.<a href="http&#58;//www.cancertodaymag.org/" target="_blank"><img alt="Cancer Today Summer 2015 Cover" src="/PublishingImages/Cancer_Today_SUM15_Cover_320x411.jpg" style="margin&#58;10px;vertical-align&#58;auto;float&#58;right;" /></a></p><p>Published quarterly by the AACR, <em>Cancer Today</em> is an authoritative resource for cancer patients, survivors, and their family members and friends. In every issue, <em>Cancer Today</em> offers information and inspiration to help readers face the challenges of diagnosis, treatment, survivorship, and caregiving.</p><p>This issue of <em>Cancer Today</em> also includes “<a href="http&#58;//www.cancertodaymag.org/SUmmer2015/Pages/Fertility-Preservation-Cancer.aspx" target="_blank">Preserving the Future</a>,” a story about how cancer treatment may affect the ability of young cancer patients to have children, and the steps they can take to preserve their fertility. </p><p>Brain cancer survivor and pediatrician P.J. Lukac <a href="http&#58;//www.cancertodaymag.org/SUmmer2015/Pages/Pediatrician-Glioblastoma-Survivor-P-J-Lukac-Has-Desire-To-Help.aspx" target="_blank">tells how cancer shaped his career path</a>, and “<a href="http&#58;//www.cancertodaymag.org/SUmmer2015/Pages/DCIS-Dilemma-Ductal-Carcinoma-In-Situ-Treatment.aspx" target="_blank">The DCIS Dilemma</a>” describes the tough treatment decisions that women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ often face.</p><p>To read these stories and others, go to <a href="http&#58;//www.cancertodaymag.org/" target="_blank"><em>Cancer Today</em></a>, or follow the magazine on <a href="https&#58;//www.facebook.com/CancerToday" target="_blank">Facebook</a> and <a href="https&#58;//twitter.com/CancerTodayMag" target="_blank">Twitter</a>. </p><p><em>Cancer Today</em> also publishes a free <a href="http&#58;//www.cancertodaymag.org/pages/newsletter-signup.aspx" target="_blank">monthly e-newsletter</a>, which contains links to web exclusives, information about events and resources, and highlights from new issues. </p><p>Media are welcome to use information from <em>Cancer Today</em>; however, we ask that you cite the source.</p></div>