Cancer Prevention Quiz

#CancerPrevention #ResearchSavesLives

  1. More than 1.8 million new cases of cancer are expected to be diagnosed in the United States in 2020. What percentage of cancer diagnoses in the U.S. are the result of preventable causes?
    1. 7 percent
    2. 18 percent
    3. 26 percent
    4. 31 percent
    5. 40 percent
Researchers estimate that more than 40 percent of the cancer cases diagnosed in the United States and nearly half of all deaths from cancer are caused by potentially avoidable cancer risk factors.

Learn more about how research is driving progress against cancer including cancer prevention and risk factors in the AACR Cancer Progress Report 2018.
  1. What are the top three modifiable risk factors for developing cancer?
    1. Tobacco use, excess body weight, alcohol intake
    2. Tobacco use, sun/UV exposure, alcohol use
    3. Tobacco use, cancer-causing pathogens, physical inactivity
    4. Tobacco use, sun/UV exposure, excess body weight
    5. Tobacco use, physical inactivity, sun/UV exposure
Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of cancer and deaths from cancer in the United States and worldwide.

Researchers estimate that 7.8 percent of all cancer cases diagnosed in the United States are related to excess body weight. It is also estimated to be responsible for 6.5 percent of cancer deaths. Moreover, researchers estimate that 15 percent of all cancer cases diagnosed in the U.S. are related to people being overweight or obese, inactive, and/or eating a poor diet. Learn more about the cancer risks of excess body weight, inactivity, and eating a poor diet.

Researchers estimate that alcohol consumption will be responsible for 5.6 percent of the new cancer cases diagnosed in the United States in 2018 and for 4 percent of the cancer deaths.

Learn more about how research is driving progress against cancer including cancer prevention and risk factors in the AACR Cancer Progress Report 2018.
  1. Tobacco use, including smoking, caused an estimated 169,180 deaths in 2014, according to the most recent data. Including lung cancer, how many different types of cancer are linked to tobacco use?
    1. 7
    2. 11
    3. 18
    4. 23
    5. 35
Smoking is linked to 17 different types of cancer in addition to lung cancer. Even individuals who smoke fewer than one cigarette per day over their lifetime have a higher risk of death than nonsmokers. Fortunately, cessation at any age can reduce the risk of cancer occurrence and cancer-related death.

Learn more about how research is driving progress against cancer including cancer prevention and risk factors in the AACR Cancer Progress Report 2018.
  1. The most recent estimate is that 13 percent of all new cancer cases diagnosed worldwide in 2018 were attributable to persistent infection with pathogens. What are the most common cancer-causing pathogens?
    1. Helicobacter pylori
    2. Hepatitis B virus (HBV)
    3. Hepatitis C virus (HCV)
    4. Human papilloma virus (HPV)
    5. All of the above
There are strategies available to eliminate, treat, or prevent infection with Helicobacter pylori, HBV, HCV, and HPV that can significantly lower an individual's risks for developing an infection-related cancer. It is important to note that these strategies are not effective at treating infection-related cancers once they develop. It is also clear that these strategies are not being used optimally.

For example, even though the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended one-time HCV testing for baby boomers in 2013, data from a 2015 national survey showed that only 10.5 out of 76.2 million adults eligible for testing reported getting tested. Given that infection with HCV is estimated to be responsible for six out of 10 liver cancer cases diagnosed in the United States since 2000, the burden of this disease could be significantly reduced through more effective implementation of HCV screening and treatment.

Learn more about how research is driving progress against cancer including cancer prevention and risk factors in the AACR Cancer Progress Report 2018.
  1. Changing or modifying certain behaviors can reduce your risk for developing cancer. Which of the following lifestyle modifications can reduce your risk of cancer?
    1. Stay physically active
    2. Limit consumption of red meat and processed foods
    3. Maintain a healthy (lean) weight
    4. Limit alcohol consumption
    5. All of the above.
Many modifiable lifestyle factors increase a person's risk of developing cancer and can also increase risk of cancer recurrence and reduce survival time following cancer. Learn more about modifying behaviors to improve cancer outcomes.

Learn more about how research is driving progress against cancer including cancer prevention and risk factors in the AACR Cancer Progress Report 2019.
Thank you for participating in the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)'s cancer prevention and risk reduction quiz highlighting just some of the advances in prevention research that are saving lives today.
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The AACR. Leading Discoveries. Targeting Cures. Saving Lives.
Question #1: More than 1.8 million new cases of cancer are expected to be diagnosed in the United States in 2020. What percentage of cancer diagnoses in the U.S. are the result of preventable causes?
Answer: 40 percent
Researchers estimate that more than 40 percent of the cancer cases diagnosed in the United States and nearly half of all deaths from cancer are caused by potentially avoidable cancer risk factors.
Question #2: What are the top three modifiable risk factors for developing cancer?
Answer: Tobacco use, excess body weight, alcohol intake
Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of cancer and deaths from cancer in the United States and worldwide. Researchers estimate that 7.8 percent of all cancer cases diagnosed in the United States are related to excess body weight. Researchers estimate that alcohol consumption will be responsible for 5.6 percent of the new cancer cases diagnosed in the United States in 2018.
Question #3: Tobacco use, including smoking, caused an estimated 169,180 deaths in 2014, according to the most recent data. Including lung cancer, how many different types of cancer are linked to tobacco use?
Answer: 18
Smoking is linked to 17 different types of cancer in addition to lung cancer. Even individuals who smoke fewer than one cigarette per day over their lifetime have a higher risk of death than nonsmokers. Fortunately, cessation at any age can reduce the risk of cancer occurrence and cancer-related death.
Question #4: The most recent estimate is that 13 percent of all new cancer cases diagnosed worldwide in 2018 were attributable to persistent infection with pathogens. What are the most common cancer-causing pathogens?
Answer: All of the above
There are strategies available to eliminate, treat, or prevent infection with Helicobacter pylori, Hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human papilloma virus (HPV) that can significantly lower an individual's risks for developing an infection-related cancer. It is important to note that these strategies are not effective at treating infection-related cancers once they develop. It is also clear that these strategies are not being used optimally.
Question #5: Changing or modifying certain behaviors can reduce your risk for developing cancer. Which of the following lifestyle modifications can reduce your risk of cancer?
Answer: All of the above (Stay physically active, Limit consumption of red meat and processed foods, Maintain a healthy lean weight, Limit alcohol consumption)
Many modifiable lifestyle factors increase a person's risk of developing cancer and can also increase risk of cancer recurrence and reduce survival time following cancer.


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